• 24/7

Writing A College Research Paper

Barbara Walvoord E. Assessing and Improving Student Writing in College. A Guide for Institutions, General Education, Departments, and Classrooms

Barbara Walvoord E. Assessing and Improving Student Writing in College. A Guide for Institutions, General Education, Departments, and Classrooms

Step-by-step guidance for shaping better writers while keeping faculty workloads manageable Effective communication is a critical skill for many academic disciplines and careers, and so colleges and universities and their faculty members are rightfully committed to improving student writing across the curriculum. Guiding and assessing student writing in classrooms, general education, and departments takes knowledge, planning, and persistence, but it can be done effectively and efficiently. Written in the concise, accessible style Barbara Walvoord is known for, Assessing and Improving Student Writing in College: A Guide for Institutions, General Education, Departments, and Classrooms offers administrators, program chairs, general education leaders, and classroom instructors the guidance they need. The book provides concrete suggestions for how to: Articulate goals for student writing Measure student writing Improve student writing Document that improvement The book begins by addressing four basic concepts: what we mean by writing, what we mean by «good» writing, how students learn to write, and the purposes of assessment. Next, Walvoord explains the various approaches and methods for assessing writing, urging a combination of them adapted to the institution's purposes and political context. After this introduction, successive chapters offer realistic, practical advice to institution-wide and general education leaders, department members, and classroom instructors. Walvoord addresses issues such as how to engage faculty, how to use rubrics, how to aggregate assessment information at the department and institutional levels, and how to report assessment information to accreditors. The chapter for classroom instructors offers practical suggestions: how to add more writing to a course without substantially increasing the grading load; how to construct writing assignments, how to make grading and responding more effective and time-efficient, how to address grammar and punctuation, and how to support students whose native language is not English. The book also includes four helpful appendices: a taxonomy of Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) and Writing in the Disciplines (WID) programs; sample outlines for faculty development workshops; a student survey on teaching methods instructors can use to inform their choices in the classroom; and a student self-check cover sheet designed to help students take ownership of their own learning and responsibility for turning in complete, correct assignments. Practical, step-by-step guidance for each point in the assessment and improvement process creates a cohesive, institution-wide system that keeps students, faculty, and administrators on the same page.

Carrie  Winstanley Writing a Dissertation For Dummies

Carrie Winstanley Writing a Dissertation For Dummies

Producing a dissertation has become a major requirement of most university courses, both undergraduate and Masters. It's likely to be the largest single piece of work you'll have to submit – and also the hardest! Writing a Dissertation For Dummies walks you through all the practical and theoretical aspects of writing a dissertation to help you produce a first-class work. This guide is ideal for any student in the broad range of the social sciences, from anthropology to law, psychology to media studies. From choosing a topic, to researching the literature, utilising your supervisor, managing your time, and structuring and writing your dissertation, you'll be able to avoid all the common mistakes and stay on top of your workload throughout the process. You'll also find tips on the best way to reference your work, and expert advice on presentation and binding. This is a must if you want to maximise your marks on your university dissertation. Writing a Dissertation For Dummies covers: Part I: What is a Dissertation? Chapter 1: So You Have to Write a Dissertation Chapter 2: Thinking About a Research Question Part II: Getting Set Up for Your Dissertation Chapter 3: The Structure of Your Dissertation Chapter 4: Getting Started Chapter 5: Finalising Your Research Question, Dissertation 'Type' And Considering Ethics Chapter 6: Reading Efficiently and Taking Useful Notes Part III: Getting On With Your Research Chapter 7: Researching in Libraries and the Using the Internet Chapter 8: Creating Your Own Empirical Data Chapter 9: Analysing Data And Drawing Conclusions Chapter 10: Staying on Track Part IV: Writing and Polishing Chapter 11: Managing Your Argument: 'Writing Up' Your Non-Empirical Dissertation Chapter 12: Writing Up Your Empirical Dissertation Chapter 13: Writing Effectively Chapter 14: References, Bibliographies and Appendices Chapter 15: Sorting Out The Presentation of Your Dissertation Part V: Managing The Overall Experience Chapter 16: Your Work Habits Chapter 17: Looking After Yourself Physically and Emotionally Chapter 18: Ten Common Dissertation Pitfalls to Avoid Chapter 19: Ten Essential Tips For Completing Your Dissertation Chapter 20: Ten Items For Your Very Final Checklist