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Literature Based Dissertation

Carrie  Winstanley Writing a Dissertation For Dummies

Carrie Winstanley Writing a Dissertation For Dummies

Producing a dissertation has become a major requirement of most university courses, both undergraduate and Masters. It's likely to be the largest single piece of work you'll have to submit – and also the hardest! Writing a Dissertation For Dummies walks you through all the practical and theoretical aspects of writing a dissertation to help you produce a first-class work. This guide is ideal for any student in the broad range of the social sciences, from anthropology to law, psychology to media studies. From choosing a topic, to researching the literature, utilising your supervisor, managing your time, and structuring and writing your dissertation, you'll be able to avoid all the common mistakes and stay on top of your workload throughout the process. You'll also find tips on the best way to reference your work, and expert advice on presentation and binding. This is a must if you want to maximise your marks on your university dissertation. Writing a Dissertation For Dummies covers: Part I: What is a Dissertation? Chapter 1: So You Have to Write a Dissertation Chapter 2: Thinking About a Research Question Part II: Getting Set Up for Your Dissertation Chapter 3: The Structure of Your Dissertation Chapter 4: Getting Started Chapter 5: Finalising Your Research Question, Dissertation 'Type' And Considering Ethics Chapter 6: Reading Efficiently and Taking Useful Notes Part III: Getting On With Your Research Chapter 7: Researching in Libraries and the Using the Internet Chapter 8: Creating Your Own Empirical Data Chapter 9: Analysing Data And Drawing Conclusions Chapter 10: Staying on Track Part IV: Writing and Polishing Chapter 11: Managing Your Argument: 'Writing Up' Your Non-Empirical Dissertation Chapter 12: Writing Up Your Empirical Dissertation Chapter 13: Writing Effectively Chapter 14: References, Bibliographies and Appendices Chapter 15: Sorting Out The Presentation of Your Dissertation Part V: Managing The Overall Experience Chapter 16: Your Work Habits Chapter 17: Looking After Yourself Physically and Emotionally Chapter 18: Ten Common Dissertation Pitfalls to Avoid Chapter 19: Ten Essential Tips For Completing Your Dissertation Chapter 20: Ten Items For Your Very Final Checklist

Hugo S. L. Hens Performance Based Building Design 2. From Timber-framed Construction to Partition Walls

Hugo S. L. Hens Performance Based Building Design 2. From Timber-framed Construction to Partition Walls

Just like building physics, performance based building design was hardly an issue before the energy crises of the 1970ies. With the need to upgrade energy efficiency, the interest in overall building performance grew. The term «performance» encompasses all building-related physical properties and qualities that are predictable during the design stage and controllable during and after construction. The term «predictable» demands calculation tools and physical models that allow evaluating a design, whereas «controllable» presumes the existence of measuring methods available on site. The basis for a system of performance arrays are the functional demands, the needs for accessibility, safety, well-being, durability, energy efficiency and sustainability and the requirements imposed by the usage of a building. In continuation of Vol. 1 this second volume discusses light-weight construction with wooden and metal elements, roofing systems, facades, and ends with finishes and the overall risk analysis. Most chapters build on a same scheme: overview, overall performance evaluation, design and construction. The work is absolutely recommended to undergraduates and graduates in architectural and building engineering, though also building engineers, who want to refresh their knowledge, may benefit. The level of discussion assumes the reader has a sound knowledge of building physics, along with a background in structural engineering, building materials and building construction. Where and when needed, input and literature from over the world was used, reason why each chapter ends listing references and literature.

Hugo S. L. Hens Performance Based Building Design 1. From Below Grade Construction to Cavity Walls

Hugo S. L. Hens Performance Based Building Design 1. From Below Grade Construction to Cavity Walls

Just like building physics, performance based building design was hardly an issue before the energy crises of the 1970s. With the need to upgrade energy efficiency, the interest in overall building performance grew. The term «performance» encompasses all building-related physical properties and qualities that are predictable during the design stage and controllable during and after construction. The term «predictable» demands calculation tools and physical models that allow evaluating a design, whereas «controllable» presumes the existence of measuring methods available on site. The basis for a system of performance arrays are the functional demands, the needs for accessibility, safety, well-being, durability, energy efficiency and sustainability and the requirements imposed by the usage of a building. As the first of two volumes, this book applies the performance rationale, advanced in applied building physics, to the design and construction of buildings. After an overview of materials for thermal insulation, water proofing, air tightening and vapour tightening and a discussion on joints, building construction is analysed, starting with the excavations. Then foundations, below and on grade constructions, typical load bearing systems and floors pass the review to end with massive outer walls insulated at the inside and the outside and cavity walls. Most chapters build on a same scheme: overview, overall performance evaluation, design and construction. The book is absolutely recommended to undergraduates and graduates in architectural and building engineering, though also building engineers, who want to refresh their knowledge, may benefit. The level of discussion assumes the reader has a sound knowledge of building physics, along with a background in structural engineering, building materials and building construction. Where and when needed, input and literature from over the world was used, reason why each chapter ends listing references and literature.